HomeLearning CenterVideosVoice of Her Own Playlist

A Voice of Her Own: South Carolina Women in Politics - Reconstruction

SC Women Lead August 5, 2020 11:47 am

Culminating 100 years ago with the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, Women’s suffrage was considered the largest reform movement in United States history. It took decades. Its participants believed that the vote for women was essential to achieving economic, social, and political equality. 

However, unfortunate but long-standing cultural divides between Southern white and black women compromised South Carolina’s efforts for women’s suffrage. Therefore the period of time between Reconstruction, Jim Crow and the Civil Rights Movement offered decades of missed opportunities for the women’s suffrage movement in South Carolina. 

By the early 1900s woman suffrage had become a mainstream issue in South Carolina, White women organized suffrage leagues around the state, but black women were excluded from those organizations. Many Southern women continued to be conflicted by traditional values.

However, South Carolina women were among the officers of the Equal Rights Association as early as 1869, but there was little active support from the state’s women and even less from the state’s men. Delegates to South Carolina’s 1895 constitutional convention defeated a proposal to allow women to vote, with the state senator John T. Sloan, Jr., declaring that “God never intended her to be put on an equality with man in any respect.” 

Finally, the Nineteenth Amendment was passed into law in 1920 without the support of South Carolina’s General Assembly…. which did not ratify it until 1969!

Culminating 100 years ago with the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, Women’s suffrage was considered the largest reform movement in United States history. It took decades. Its participants believed that the vote for women was essential to achieving economic, social, and political equality.

However, unfortunate but long-standing cultural divides between Southern white and black women compromised South Carolina’s efforts for women’s suffrage. Therefore the period of time between Reconstruction, Jim Crow and the Civil Rights Movement offered decades of missed opportunities for the women’s suffrage movement in South Carolina.

By the early 1900s woman suffrage had become a mainstream issue in South Carolina, White women organized suffrage leagues around the state, but black women were excluded from those organizations. Many Southern women continued to be conflicted by traditional values.

However, South Carolina women were among the officers of the Equal Rights Association as early as 1869, but there was little active support from the state’s women and even less from the state’s men. Delegates to South Carolina’s 1895 constitutional convention defeated a proposal to allow women to vote, with the state senator John T. Sloan, Jr., declaring that “God never intended her to be put on an equality with man in any respect.”

Finally, the Nineteenth Amendment was passed into law in 1920 without the support of South Carolina’s General Assembly…. which did not ratify it until 1969!

YouTube Video UEw5VXJ3S3c3WTNHWVJvNG1sR1Axd016N3RTYVVQSGhIZC4wOTA3OTZBNzVEMTUzOTMy

A Voice of Her Own: South Carolina Women in Politics - The Suffrage Movement

SC Women Lead August 5, 2020 11:51 am